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A Brief History Of FE Myers Water Pumps- Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Myers Florida Pump Service

Myers Water Pumps are some of the most popular Pumps in the U.S and abroad. They revolutionized the Water Pump Industry and made many very important technological advancements. Here’s a look at their history.

After the Civil War there were many opportunities for those with ambition and Francis E. Myers was among them. In 1870 Francis and his brother Philip stopped working on their father’s farm and began “The F.E. Myers & Bro. Company”. Francis and Philip both played very important roles in the company’s success. Francis was known as a great sales person and was able to handle the business end of things while Philip was acknowledged as a “mechanical genius “.

FE Myers caught its first break when they patented a Double Action Pump. The pump allowed water to flow in a stream instead of coming out erratically. Although the Double Action Pump was successful, FE Myers big break happened after they patented a Water Pump with a special glass vale seat that would not leak or corrode. The design was wildly popular and forced Myers competitors to purchase it through them.  

Myers Glass Valve Seat Patent

With the success of their patents and designed the Myers brothers needed help and brought on their other two brothers, Alvah and Denton. The company continued to grow and just 12 years after starting the company boasted having 30,000 dealers that were selling their water pumps. Fe Myers died in 1923 and left the company in the hands of Philip who then passed away in 1932. FE Myers continued its success even through the stock market crash of 1929.

In the 1950’s the demand for household water pumps was dwindling so Myers began manufacturing Water Filtration and Water Softening Systems. They also saw a demand for more efficient water pumps and began manufacturing them. Myers was sold to McNeil Machine and Engineering Co. in 1960. Twenty Six years later Pentair Inc purchased McNeil and still sells Myers Brand Pumps today.

Reference: 

A History of F.E. Myers and Bro., By Jan Shellhouse,http://goo.gl/FWLaeP

Tags :  MyersWater PumpJet PumpHistory
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Don’t Let Your Pool Drain Your Account: Picking the Right Pool Pump - Friday, December 5, 2014

Adding a pool to your house can be a very exciting experience. You finally made it and now you have so many choices to make to have the pool of your dreams. With all of this excitement it is very easy to overlook some very important things that will have a big impact on your wallet over time.

One aspect of your pool that is very important is the Pool Pump that you choose. Single Speed Pumps are very common among pools because they are relatively inexpensive. One thing to keep in mind with when buying a pool pump is that you don’t want to think of the purchasing price but rather the cost to operate the pump. This is very important as it will save you money in the long run.

The way to make sure you save more money long term is to buy either a Two Speed or Variable Speed Pool Pump. These pumps allow you to change speed they are running at. With these pumps you can set the pump to run at a high speed when you are doing something intensive (ie vacumming the pool) and the rest of the time run it at a lower speed. This will save you 40 to 70 percent on monthly costs.

Many people are also under the misconception that the more Horsepower a Pool Pump has the better it is. Higher Horsepower does mean that the pump is more powerful but it definitely doesn’t mean it runs more efficiently. In fact, on top of having a Two Speed or Variable Speed Pump, the lower horse power your Pump runs at the more money you save on energy costs.

Pool Pump Cost Performance 


Cost Breakdown of Pump Size to Operating Cost
About.Com 

 

 

 

These are just a few of the very important tips that will make sure your pool doesn’t drain your bank account.

Tags :  savepool pumpnew poolpool ownershipenergygreentwo speedone speedvariable
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Freeze Watch and Pump Protection for Northeast Florida- Monday, November 17, 2014

Freeze Watch and Pump Protection for Northeast Florida

Severe weather is headed to Jacksonville, and we have our first hard freeze watch of the year.  The NOAA issued the warning this morning.  The full warning is here.  

The warning is Clay, Flagler, Putnam, and St. Johns Counties.  Temperatures are expected to be in the freezing range anywhere from 4-11 hours Tuesday evening to Wednesday morning.  A freeze of 6 hours or more is considered very dangerous to your pump and pump system.  It is important that you take precautions to protect your pump system.  For tips on how to protect your system, you can check our troubleshooting page.

As always, if you have any questions, or need to schedule service you can contact us at 904-269-0202.  If you would like to schedule service online, fill out our service request form, and someone will contact you shortly.

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DIY Replace Shallow Well Jet Pump- Thursday, November 13, 2014

DIY Replace Shallow Well Jet Pump


Removing Old Jet Pump

Step 1 Shut off Electric from Electrical Panel

Step 2 Isolate/ Shut off Water to the House/Building

Step 3 Disconnect Electrical Wires connected to Switch

Step 4 Disconnet Suction Line from the Head of the Pump.

* Tip: Make sure to have Bucket or Tub to catch water

Step 5 Disconnect Water Line going to the Pressure end of the Pump

Step 6 Remove Schraeder Vale to Release Vaccum

Step 7 Open Valve to Drain tank until it empties


Wooo... Now that we got that out of the way it is time to put in your New Shallow Jet Pump . If you don't have one yet check out our selection HERE

Step 1 Check existing Water Connections for any serious alignment issues with New Jet Pump

Step 2 Install Existing Pipe into the Bladder tank of the New Pump

Step 3 Install new Mounting Bracket to Bladder Tank

Step 4 Mount New Shallow Well Jet Pump to Bladder Tank

Step 5 Wrap Telflon Tape around Brass Bushing 3 times for Suction

Step 6 Reinstall Fiited Piping to the Jet Pump Head

Step 7 Reinstall Fitted Piping to Pressure Side of Pump

Step 8 Set pump Electrical Requirements

Step 9 Use Teflon tap to wrap secure pipes together

Step 10 Reconnect Jet Pump to Water Piping

Step 11 Reconnect Electrical Supply

Step 12 Check for Operation and Leaks

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Pool Pumps: Single Speed vs. Two Speed- Friday, November 7, 2014

Pool Pumps: Single Speed vs. Two Speed

 

When you are a new pool owner it is very easy to become overwhelmed with all of the options that are out there. There are many different brands and models out there, not to mention Horse Power, Speed and Voltage of each Pool Pump. Today we are going to talk about the difference between Single Speed Pumps and Two Speed Pumps.

 

Single Speed Pool Pumps

 

An easy way to think about Single Speed Pool Pumps is that they run at one constant speed. With these pumps there's no guess work on which speed they are running. They only have two modes, being turned on and turned off. One great thing about the simplicity of the Single Speed Pool Pumps is that they tend to last a long time. One Brand in particular that is known for being long lasting is Hayward Super Pump.It has been the industry standard for a long time.

 

Advantage

 

Single Speed Pumps are very efficient since they are only set to one speed. These pumps will always be set to the high setting. Single Speed Pumps also tend to be less expensive since they have been used for a long time.

 

Disadvantage

 

Since the Single Speed Pool Pumps are always set to the highest speed they are not very energy efficient. These pumps also tend to be louder because of the high speed.

 

A few High Quality Single Speed Pump Brands are:

 

Hayward

Pentair

- Betta Flow

 

Two Speed Pumps

 

Two Speed Pumps are very similar to One Speed Pumps but they have both a low and high speed. The low function is used for basic functions like circulating water through your pool. The high speed is used for more intensive things like using your pool heater.

 

Advantage

 

The obvious advantage of the Two Speed Pool Pumps is that you can alternate between two speeds. For the most part you will set it to the Low Speed and in turn you will save a lot of energy costs compared to the One Speed Pumps.

 

Disadvantage

 

The main disadvantage of the Two Speed Pool Pumps is that they can be significantly more expensive than the Single Speed Pumps.

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Checking a Bladder Tank- Monday, July 29, 2013
How to check your bladder tank, to insure that your entire system functions properly. We recommend you do this at least every 6 months.

Is your pump cycling on and off within spans of 5-20 seconds? If so, your bladder tank will need to be checked, before further damage is done to the pump and motor.

In order to ensure that your system operates properly and functions well, it is recommended that you check your bladder tank a minimum of once every 6 months. The following is a step by step guide to checking your bladder tank on three different systems.

Click here to see our pressure tanks for sale

NOTEThis is for bladder tanks only. Galvanized tanks are NOT bladder tanks.

1. House Water System 2. Water to Air Heat Pump System 3. Artesian Well or Flowing Well System

1. House Water System

Step 1. Observe gauge and note what pressure the pump comes on at. Turn power to the pump off.

Step 2. Drain all pressure off the system at hose bib.

Step 3. Take cap off valve at Schrader valve and check pressure with a tire gauge. The pressure in the tank should be 2 lbs less than the come on pressure for the pump. (Ex: If your pump is set to come on at 30 psi, then your tank should have a pressure of 28 psi).

Add or release pressure in tank with an appropriate air pump or compressor. If the tank won’t pressurize or will not hold pressure, the tank will need to be replaced.

Step 4. After the tank has been set at the proper air pressure, replace cap and Schrader valve and turn the power to the pump back on, following procedure in reverse.

2. Water to Air Heat Pump System

Step 1. Observe gauge and note what pressure the pump comes on at. Turn power to the pump off.

Step 2. Drain all pressure off the system by turning the A/C or heat on for about 2 minutes, then turn it back off.

Step 3. Take cap off valve at Schrader valve and check pressure with a tire gauge. The pressure in the tank should be 2 lbs less than the come on pressure for the pump. (Ex: If your pump is set to come on at 30 psi, then your tank should have a pressure of 28 psi).

Add or release pressure in tank with an appropriate air pump or compressor. If the tank won’t pressurize or will not hold pressure, the tank will need to be replaced.

Step 4. After the tank has been set at the proper air pressure, replace cap and Schrader valve and turn the power to the pump back on, following procedure in reverse.

3. Artesian Well or Flowing Well

Step 1. Observe gauge and note what pressure the pump comes on at. Turn power to the pump off.

Step 2. Turn the valve at the well off and open a hose bib to release all pressure in the system.

Step 3. Take cap off valve at Schrader valve and check pressure with a tire gauge. The pressure in the tank should be 2 lbs less than the come on pressure for the pump. (Ex: If your pump is set to come on at 30 psi, then your tank should have a pressure of 28 psi).

Add or release pressure in tank with an appropriate air pump or compressor. If the tank won’t pressurize or will not hold pressure, the tank will need to be replaced.

Step 4. After the tank has been set at the proper air pressure, replace cap and Schrader valve and turn the power to the pump back on, following procedure in reverse.

NOTE: It is not normal for a pump to lose its prime during this procedure. If this occurs, prime the pump normally.

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About Water Treatment and Filters- Monday, July 29, 2013
Learn about the different types water impurities and how Florida Pump Service can help you with them.

In North Florida 95% of the time there is iron or minerals in your water whether it be your private well or city water. When they are present this is called “hard” water. City water is from deep wells and the water is aerated to remove the sulfur gas (rotten egg smell). City water is also chlorinated to remove any and all bacteria from wells or transmission lines. Besides “hard” water some private drinking water wells produce sulfur, iron stain (water that stains sinks orange or brown) and iron bacteria (IB). Iron bacteria is a growth in the water which will not harm you to drink, but can cause major problems with water conditioners or house plumbing.

The water treatments used to remove sulfur, minerals, iron and bacteria vary widely. Having been in business since 1948, we have come up with treatment solutions that we recommend that are “simple, efficient and in most cases are a lot less expensive” than other water treatment companies. Most all the $900 plus installed units below come in an automatic or manual version. An overview of the different units and systems is below.

Sulfur Water: The sulfur gases in the water always have to be removed before any other treatment equipment can be installed. If not it can damage that equipment. Sulfur can be removed in only one of two man made ways – either aerate or chlorinate. Aerating is much less costly to install and maintain than chlorination systems. A standard 250 gallon fiberglass aerator installed outside is simple. In most all cases it requires an additional pump and tank. Average installation (with a pump & tank) runs $1,600 to $2,200. There are new inside aerator systems on the market that inject air in the water and require no additional pump and tank. They work in about 60% to 70% of the cases depending on sulfur content and usage. The average cost installed is $1,200. The average cost of operation and maintenance for either unit per year is $130.

Iron Bacteria: This is a non-harmful organisms found in 10% of old or new wells. Left untreated it will damage water conditioners, filters and plumbing pipes. If you want to know if you have Iron Bacteria take the lid off one of your toilet tanks. If the inside walls are slimy – you’ve got it. Iron Bacteria has to be removed before any other water treatment equipment is installed. The only way to remove Iron Bacteria is to install a CIRS. This is a chlorine injection removal system. It is composed of a pump, contact tank, chlorine tank and cartridge filter. The average cost of an installed system is $1,600. The average cost of operation and maintenance is $20 per month.

Water Softener: This unit removes all the minerals from the water. It also takes out iron stain up to “3” parts per million. These units are recommended on all water systems whether it be a private well or city water. By removing all the minerals it keeps plumbing fixtures, piping and water heaters free of destructive corrosion. These units will reduce cleaning costs and the cost of detergents. As an added value it removes “iron stain” in 85% of the cases. In most all cases they pay for themselves over a “3 to 5” year period. The average cost installed is $1,100 to $1,600. The average cost of operation and maintenance is $20 per month. Most of the operation costs are in the purchase of salt. The unit does not inject salt into the water, but utilizes it in an “ion exchange” process that “re-magnetizes” the softener media bed after it has been flushed of collected minerals.

Iron Filter: When “iron stain” levels reach above “3” parts per million an iron filter must be used. If a water softener is used, iron filters are installed immediately before. An iron filter can be installed without a water softener, however, it’s not recommended. The unit uses potassium permanganate as a recharging agent to recoat the media bed after it has been flushed of collected iron. The average cost of installation is $1,100 to $1,600. The average cost of operation and maintenance per month is $20.

Chlorine Sanitizing System: This is the same system as the CIRS above (used in the removal of Iron Bacteria). These systems are used in public facilities where the State government requires a private business to sanitize their well drinking water for public consumption. Cartridge Filter: These are small filters that use a 12” cartridge. There are two types of cartridges – one for sediment removal and one for taste & odor removal. The sediment cartridges are used in conjunction with a CIRS. They remove some small scale and debris caused by pipes flaking off scale. They tend to clog up rapidly and reduce incoming water pressure. The taste & odor filters basically disguise the taste of the water. They work slightly on city water, but clog up rapidly on well water when used in lieu of proper treatment equipment. We only recommend the sediment cartridge filter when used with a CIRS.

Carbon Filters: These units are used when all the chlorine tastes are desired to be removed from the water before entering the house. These units installed run between $900 and $1,300. The carbon needs to be replaced once every “3 to 5” years at a cost of $400.

Clear View Sand Filters: If you have a shallow well, these filters are excellent in removing fine sand that can be produced by the well. They also can be used temporarily on a drinking water well that is going bad and producing sand. We say temporarily because a new well is needed. These filters are easy to clean and maintain. They come in several sizes depending of the volume of water that is being used. The average cost installed is $140 to $280. The average monthly maintenance costs are little or nothing.

Everpure Drinking Water System (EDWS): These units are mounted under a sink and have a spout on the kitchen sink above. Unlike most inexpensive filters that say they give you safe water to drink, these units actually do. They remove up to 99% of all dangerous matter in the water. They are the least expensive way of providing clean drinking water to your home. If used on a well system the sulfur and iron bacteria must be removed before an EDWS can be installed. Major companies such as Pepsi, McDonalds and Coca Cola use these type systems in their water processing. The average cost installed is $375. These units use a $95 cartridge that has to be replaced every “12 to 24” months. We highly recommend these units to save you the cost and aggravation of bottled water.

Reverse Osmosis System (ROS): These units are mounted the same as the EDWS units above. They provide 99.9% safe water to drink. The problem with these units are that they (1) strip the water of all taste (2) are expensive to install – $700 to $1,200 and (3) have a high cost of maintenance and operation – $200 to $400 per year. We do not recommend these units.

Green Sand Filter: This is a tank system that sulfur water is run through to disguise the smell and taste of the water. By not removing the sulfur, the sulfur gases can still damage treatment equipment. Not recommended.

Click here to learn about ordering a water analysis

NOTE: This information, while possibly available in your area, is intended for our customers in the northeast Florida area.

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Water Analysis- Monday, July 29, 2013
Florida Pump Service offers different kinds of water analysis. Let our lab test your water for Bacteria, Lead, Iron, Nitrate, Nitrite, PH levels, Chlorine, and Turbidity.

Please read the following information and choose the Water Analysis that is appropriate for you. Please note that you may need to check with your mortgage company to see which analysis they require if the analysis will be used for the closing.

Due to incubation requirements by the lab, water analysis can be collected on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Please order your test to allow time for collections and lab analysis.

The fees described below include collection of the water sample by a qualified technician, preparation of the sample for lab testing, chain of custody, documentation, and lab processing fees.

Please note that in order to take a water sample we must have an operational well and pump. Also we will need access to the area where the sample will be taken. The location of where the sample will be taken will vary depending on the type of water analysis collected. Please note the information listed below.

If you would like order a water analysis, please call us at 904.269.0202 or Email Us

Chemical and Bacteria

  • Checks Bacteria (Total Coliform, E. Coli)
  • This is the test that is typically required for conventional loans. This sample can only be taken on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Turn around time is approximately one week. If you are requesting this water analysis for a mortgage company, please verify this is the analysis needed prior to requesting the analysis. In order to take this sample, we must have access to the well head and well pump with the well pump operational.
  • $225.00 plus tax

Chemical/Bacteria/Lead

  • Checks Bacteria (Total Coliform, E. Coli), Lead, Nitrate, Nitrite, Total Nitrate/Nitrite, PH, Iron, and Turbidity
  • This water analysis is most commonly requested for FHA, and some times for VA Mortgages. This sample can only be taken on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Turn around time is approximately one week. If you are requesting this water analysis for a mortgage company, please verify this is the analysis needed prior to requesting the analysis. In order to take this sample, we must have access to the well head, well pump, and inside faucet.
  • $315.00 Plus Tax

Complete Water Analysis

  • Checks Alkalinity, Bacteria (Total Coliform, E. Coli), Nitrate, Nitrite, Clarity, Chlorine, Color, Copper, Hardness, Iron, Lead, Total Nitrate/Nitrite, and PH. This water analysis is typically requested by the buyers or homeowners who are interested in the quality of their water. This sample can only be taken on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Turn around time is approximately one week. If you are requesting this water analysis for a mortgage company, please verify this is the analysis needed prior to requesting the analysis. In order to take this sample, we must have access to the well head, well pump, and inside faucet.
  • $350.00 Plus Tax
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What Kind Of Pump Do You Need?- Monday, July 29, 2013
Help us help you in determining which of our pumps best suit your application. This article describes in detail some of things you need to know in order to get the right pump for your application.

In order to help in your search for the right pump, we at Florida Pump Service have come up with a list of things you need to know to choose the right pump.

The following is a list of the categories which help in your search.

Several of the following categories will need to be answered with certain measurements. In order to help with conversions, please see this unit conversion website Here

  • Voltage: What is the voltage that will be supplied to the pump? It will usually be 110, 220, 230, 240, or 220-460.
  • Hertz: What are the hertz of the pump? The United States uses 60 Hertz, while Europe and most of the world uses 50 Hertz. At this time, Florida Pump Service does not carry pumps in 50 Hertz
  • Phase: Is it single phase or three phase?
  • Horsepower: What is the horsepower of the pump?
  • Gallons Per Minute: What is the flow you need the pump to produce? This can be given in Liters or Gallons, and per minute or hour.
  • Discharge Pressure: How much pressure do you need the pump to produce? There are several different measurements for this, and we can work with any of them (i.e. PSI, feet, meters, bars, etc.).
  • Vertical Lift: What is the vertical distance from the pump to the beginning of the water? Your well may be 200 feet deep, but the water might only be 15 feet deep, or maybe the pump isn’t lifting at all, but rather drawing from a lake or boosting a high-rise. This is very important since it will effect end production of the pump.
  • Flow Rate: What is the production of the source of water? If it is a flowing well, what are the gallons per minute produced?
  • Water Drawdown: When the pump is pulling water, how far does the water source drop down? Certain wells can have significant drawdown. Serious damage can happen to a pump that is starved of water.
  • Liquid Type: What substance are you trying to pump?
  • Viscosity: How fluid is the liquid you are trying to pump?
  • PH: Do you know what the acidic level of the liquid you are pumping is?
  • Temperature: What is the temperature of the liquid you will be pumping? Certain pumps have the ability to handle extreme temperatures, while others do not
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New Law Governing Pool Pumps and Pool Pump Motors- Monday, July 29, 2013

A statewide law that covers pool pumps and pool pump motors is set to go into effect on March 15th 2012 (Full Bill). The law is part of the Florida Energy Act and changes the types of filtering pool pumps and motors that can be installed on residential pools. (Pool specific portion)

Most pool pumps are currently single speed. This means that they run at one speed the entire time they are on. The new law requires that any new pool pump, 1 HP or larger, must either be 2-speed or have a variable speed motor. So, if you are in need of a new pool pump, or you need your motor replaced, you will have a few options. First, you can replace your motor with a new 2 speed motor or variable speed motor. Or second, you can replace the whole pump with either a 2 speed or variable speed pool pump.

The downside of the new law is that there is a considerable price difference between old single speed pumps and motors. Installation and purchases can be anywhere from $400-$900 more for the new pumps. HOWEVER, these new pumps will pay for themselves in as soon as 8 months. We are seeing customers save up to $60 a month on their energy bill. So, while the initial costs are more, the savings more than pay for itself within a year.

We will be unveiling new pool pumps in the coming weeks. We’ll include reviews, specifications, and recommendations. Stay tuned.

More Information: Energy Efficiency Requirement Flow Chart Energy Law Q&A

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