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Blog posts of '2013' 'July'

Checking a Bladder Tank- Monday, July 29, 2013
How to check your bladder tank, to insure that your entire system functions properly. We recommend you do this at least every 6 months.

Is your pump cycling on and off within spans of 5-20 seconds? If so, your bladder tank will need to be checked, before further damage is done to the pump and motor.

In order to ensure that your system operates properly and functions well, it is recommended that you check your bladder tank a minimum of once every 6 months. The following is a step by step guide to checking your bladder tank on three different systems.

Click here to see our pressure tanks for sale

NOTEThis is for bladder tanks only. Galvanized tanks are NOT bladder tanks.

1. House Water System 2. Water to Air Heat Pump System 3. Artesian Well or Flowing Well System

1. House Water System

Step 1. Observe gauge and note what pressure the pump comes on at. Turn power to the pump off.

Step 2. Drain all pressure off the system at hose bib.

Step 3. Take cap off valve at Schrader valve and check pressure with a tire gauge. The pressure in the tank should be 2 lbs less than the come on pressure for the pump. (Ex: If your pump is set to come on at 30 psi, then your tank should have a pressure of 28 psi).

Add or release pressure in tank with an appropriate air pump or compressor. If the tank won’t pressurize or will not hold pressure, the tank will need to be replaced.

Step 4. After the tank has been set at the proper air pressure, replace cap and Schrader valve and turn the power to the pump back on, following procedure in reverse.

2. Water to Air Heat Pump System

Step 1. Observe gauge and note what pressure the pump comes on at. Turn power to the pump off.

Step 2. Drain all pressure off the system by turning the A/C or heat on for about 2 minutes, then turn it back off.

Step 3. Take cap off valve at Schrader valve and check pressure with a tire gauge. The pressure in the tank should be 2 lbs less than the come on pressure for the pump. (Ex: If your pump is set to come on at 30 psi, then your tank should have a pressure of 28 psi).

Add or release pressure in tank with an appropriate air pump or compressor. If the tank won’t pressurize or will not hold pressure, the tank will need to be replaced.

Step 4. After the tank has been set at the proper air pressure, replace cap and Schrader valve and turn the power to the pump back on, following procedure in reverse.

3. Artesian Well or Flowing Well

Step 1. Observe gauge and note what pressure the pump comes on at. Turn power to the pump off.

Step 2. Turn the valve at the well off and open a hose bib to release all pressure in the system.

Step 3. Take cap off valve at Schrader valve and check pressure with a tire gauge. The pressure in the tank should be 2 lbs less than the come on pressure for the pump. (Ex: If your pump is set to come on at 30 psi, then your tank should have a pressure of 28 psi).

Add or release pressure in tank with an appropriate air pump or compressor. If the tank won’t pressurize or will not hold pressure, the tank will need to be replaced.

Step 4. After the tank has been set at the proper air pressure, replace cap and Schrader valve and turn the power to the pump back on, following procedure in reverse.

NOTE: It is not normal for a pump to lose its prime during this procedure. If this occurs, prime the pump normally.

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About Water Treatment and Filters- Monday, July 29, 2013
Learn about the different types water impurities and how Florida Pump Service can help you with them.

In North Florida 95% of the time there is iron or minerals in your water whether it be your private well or city water. When they are present this is called “hard” water. City water is from deep wells and the water is aerated to remove the sulfur gas (rotten egg smell). City water is also chlorinated to remove any and all bacteria from wells or transmission lines. Besides “hard” water some private drinking water wells produce sulfur, iron stain (water that stains sinks orange or brown) and iron bacteria (IB). Iron bacteria is a growth in the water which will not harm you to drink, but can cause major problems with water conditioners or house plumbing.

The water treatments used to remove sulfur, minerals, iron and bacteria vary widely. Having been in business since 1948, we have come up with treatment solutions that we recommend that are “simple, efficient and in most cases are a lot less expensive” than other water treatment companies. Most all the $900 plus installed units below come in an automatic or manual version. An overview of the different units and systems is below.

Sulfur Water: The sulfur gases in the water always have to be removed before any other treatment equipment can be installed. If not it can damage that equipment. Sulfur can be removed in only one of two man made ways – either aerate or chlorinate. Aerating is much less costly to install and maintain than chlorination systems. A standard 250 gallon fiberglass aerator installed outside is simple. In most all cases it requires an additional pump and tank. Average installation (with a pump & tank) runs $1,600 to $2,200. There are new inside aerator systems on the market that inject air in the water and require no additional pump and tank. They work in about 60% to 70% of the cases depending on sulfur content and usage. The average cost installed is $1,200. The average cost of operation and maintenance for either unit per year is $130.

Iron Bacteria: This is a non-harmful organisms found in 10% of old or new wells. Left untreated it will damage water conditioners, filters and plumbing pipes. If you want to know if you have Iron Bacteria take the lid off one of your toilet tanks. If the inside walls are slimy – you’ve got it. Iron Bacteria has to be removed before any other water treatment equipment is installed. The only way to remove Iron Bacteria is to install a CIRS. This is a chlorine injection removal system. It is composed of a pump, contact tank, chlorine tank and cartridge filter. The average cost of an installed system is $1,600. The average cost of operation and maintenance is $20 per month.

Water Softener: This unit removes all the minerals from the water. It also takes out iron stain up to “3” parts per million. These units are recommended on all water systems whether it be a private well or city water. By removing all the minerals it keeps plumbing fixtures, piping and water heaters free of destructive corrosion. These units will reduce cleaning costs and the cost of detergents. As an added value it removes “iron stain” in 85% of the cases. In most all cases they pay for themselves over a “3 to 5” year period. The average cost installed is $1,100 to $1,600. The average cost of operation and maintenance is $20 per month. Most of the operation costs are in the purchase of salt. The unit does not inject salt into the water, but utilizes it in an “ion exchange” process that “re-magnetizes” the softener media bed after it has been flushed of collected minerals.

Iron Filter: When “iron stain” levels reach above “3” parts per million an iron filter must be used. If a water softener is used, iron filters are installed immediately before. An iron filter can be installed without a water softener, however, it’s not recommended. The unit uses potassium permanganate as a recharging agent to recoat the media bed after it has been flushed of collected iron. The average cost of installation is $1,100 to $1,600. The average cost of operation and maintenance per month is $20.

Chlorine Sanitizing System: This is the same system as the CIRS above (used in the removal of Iron Bacteria). These systems are used in public facilities where the State government requires a private business to sanitize their well drinking water for public consumption. Cartridge Filter: These are small filters that use a 12” cartridge. There are two types of cartridges – one for sediment removal and one for taste & odor removal. The sediment cartridges are used in conjunction with a CIRS. They remove some small scale and debris caused by pipes flaking off scale. They tend to clog up rapidly and reduce incoming water pressure. The taste & odor filters basically disguise the taste of the water. They work slightly on city water, but clog up rapidly on well water when used in lieu of proper treatment equipment. We only recommend the sediment cartridge filter when used with a CIRS.

Carbon Filters: These units are used when all the chlorine tastes are desired to be removed from the water before entering the house. These units installed run between $900 and $1,300. The carbon needs to be replaced once every “3 to 5” years at a cost of $400.

Clear View Sand Filters: If you have a shallow well, these filters are excellent in removing fine sand that can be produced by the well. They also can be used temporarily on a drinking water well that is going bad and producing sand. We say temporarily because a new well is needed. These filters are easy to clean and maintain. They come in several sizes depending of the volume of water that is being used. The average cost installed is $140 to $280. The average monthly maintenance costs are little or nothing.

Everpure Drinking Water System (EDWS): These units are mounted under a sink and have a spout on the kitchen sink above. Unlike most inexpensive filters that say they give you safe water to drink, these units actually do. They remove up to 99% of all dangerous matter in the water. They are the least expensive way of providing clean drinking water to your home. If used on a well system the sulfur and iron bacteria must be removed before an EDWS can be installed. Major companies such as Pepsi, McDonalds and Coca Cola use these type systems in their water processing. The average cost installed is $375. These units use a $95 cartridge that has to be replaced every “12 to 24” months. We highly recommend these units to save you the cost and aggravation of bottled water.

Reverse Osmosis System (ROS): These units are mounted the same as the EDWS units above. They provide 99.9% safe water to drink. The problem with these units are that they (1) strip the water of all taste (2) are expensive to install – $700 to $1,200 and (3) have a high cost of maintenance and operation – $200 to $400 per year. We do not recommend these units.

Green Sand Filter: This is a tank system that sulfur water is run through to disguise the smell and taste of the water. By not removing the sulfur, the sulfur gases can still damage treatment equipment. Not recommended.

Click here to learn about ordering a water analysis

NOTE: This information, while possibly available in your area, is intended for our customers in the northeast Florida area.

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Water Analysis- Monday, July 29, 2013
Florida Pump Service offers different kinds of water analysis. Let our lab test your water for Bacteria, Lead, Iron, Nitrate, Nitrite, PH levels, Chlorine, and Turbidity.

Please read the following information and choose the Water Analysis that is appropriate for you. Please note that you may need to check with your mortgage company to see which analysis they require if the analysis will be used for the closing.

Due to incubation requirements by the lab, water analysis can be collected on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Please order your test to allow time for collections and lab analysis.

The fees described below include collection of the water sample by a qualified technician, preparation of the sample for lab testing, chain of custody, documentation, and lab processing fees.

Please note that in order to take a water sample we must have an operational well and pump. Also we will need access to the area where the sample will be taken. The location of where the sample will be taken will vary depending on the type of water analysis collected. Please note the information listed below.

If you would like order a water analysis, please call us at 904.269.0202 or Email Us

Chemical and Bacteria

  • Checks Bacteria (Total Coliform, E. Coli)
  • This is the test that is typically required for conventional loans. This sample can only be taken on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Turn around time is approximately one week. If you are requesting this water analysis for a mortgage company, please verify this is the analysis needed prior to requesting the analysis. In order to take this sample, we must have access to the well head and well pump with the well pump operational.
  • $225.00 plus tax

Chemical/Bacteria/Lead

  • Checks Bacteria (Total Coliform, E. Coli), Lead, Nitrate, Nitrite, Total Nitrate/Nitrite, PH, Iron, and Turbidity
  • This water analysis is most commonly requested for FHA, and some times for VA Mortgages. This sample can only be taken on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Turn around time is approximately one week. If you are requesting this water analysis for a mortgage company, please verify this is the analysis needed prior to requesting the analysis. In order to take this sample, we must have access to the well head, well pump, and inside faucet.
  • $315.00 Plus Tax

Complete Water Analysis

  • Checks Alkalinity, Bacteria (Total Coliform, E. Coli), Nitrate, Nitrite, Clarity, Chlorine, Color, Copper, Hardness, Iron, Lead, Total Nitrate/Nitrite, and PH. This water analysis is typically requested by the buyers or homeowners who are interested in the quality of their water. This sample can only be taken on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Turn around time is approximately one week. If you are requesting this water analysis for a mortgage company, please verify this is the analysis needed prior to requesting the analysis. In order to take this sample, we must have access to the well head, well pump, and inside faucet.
  • $350.00 Plus Tax
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What Kind Of Pump Do You Need?- Monday, July 29, 2013
Help us help you in determining which of our pumps best suit your application. This article describes in detail some of things you need to know in order to get the right pump for your application.

In order to help in your search for the right pump, we at Florida Pump Service have come up with a list of things you need to know to choose the right pump.

The following is a list of the categories which help in your search.

Several of the following categories will need to be answered with certain measurements. In order to help with conversions, please see this unit conversion website Here

  • Voltage: What is the voltage that will be supplied to the pump? It will usually be 110, 220, 230, 240, or 220-460.
  • Hertz: What are the hertz of the pump? The United States uses 60 Hertz, while Europe and most of the world uses 50 Hertz. At this time, Florida Pump Service does not carry pumps in 50 Hertz
  • Phase: Is it single phase or three phase?
  • Horsepower: What is the horsepower of the pump?
  • Gallons Per Minute: What is the flow you need the pump to produce? This can be given in Liters or Gallons, and per minute or hour.
  • Discharge Pressure: How much pressure do you need the pump to produce? There are several different measurements for this, and we can work with any of them (i.e. PSI, feet, meters, bars, etc.).
  • Vertical Lift: What is the vertical distance from the pump to the beginning of the water? Your well may be 200 feet deep, but the water might only be 15 feet deep, or maybe the pump isn’t lifting at all, but rather drawing from a lake or boosting a high-rise. This is very important since it will effect end production of the pump.
  • Flow Rate: What is the production of the source of water? If it is a flowing well, what are the gallons per minute produced?
  • Water Drawdown: When the pump is pulling water, how far does the water source drop down? Certain wells can have significant drawdown. Serious damage can happen to a pump that is starved of water.
  • Liquid Type: What substance are you trying to pump?
  • Viscosity: How fluid is the liquid you are trying to pump?
  • PH: Do you know what the acidic level of the liquid you are pumping is?
  • Temperature: What is the temperature of the liquid you will be pumping? Certain pumps have the ability to handle extreme temperatures, while others do not
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New Law Governing Pool Pumps and Pool Pump Motors- Monday, July 29, 2013

A statewide law that covers pool pumps and pool pump motors is set to go into effect on March 15th 2012 (Full Bill). The law is part of the Florida Energy Act and changes the types of filtering pool pumps and motors that can be installed on residential pools. (Pool specific portion)

Most pool pumps are currently single speed. This means that they run at one speed the entire time they are on. The new law requires that any new pool pump, 1 HP or larger, must either be 2-speed or have a variable speed motor. So, if you are in need of a new pool pump, or you need your motor replaced, you will have a few options. First, you can replace your motor with a new 2 speed motor or variable speed motor. Or second, you can replace the whole pump with either a 2 speed or variable speed pool pump.

The downside of the new law is that there is a considerable price difference between old single speed pumps and motors. Installation and purchases can be anywhere from $400-$900 more for the new pumps. HOWEVER, these new pumps will pay for themselves in as soon as 8 months. We are seeing customers save up to $60 a month on their energy bill. So, while the initial costs are more, the savings more than pay for itself within a year.

We will be unveiling new pool pumps in the coming weeks. We’ll include reviews, specifications, and recommendations. Stay tuned.

More Information: Energy Efficiency Requirement Flow Chart Energy Law Q&A

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Who is Pedrollo?- Monday, July 29, 2013
Florida Pump Service would like you to know a little bit about the wonderful company we distribute for.

As the distributor of Pedrollo pumps, we, at Florida Pump Service, feel its important to let you know about the company of Pedrollo.

Founded in 1974, Pedrollo Spa is now a reference mark in the water supply sector worldwide.

The 15 acre factory is located in Verona, Italy. The Company utilizes extremely high level technology and automation which positions the Company at the highest level in its field, both for the level of investment and for its ability to control quality throughout the entire production process.

Pedrollo produces almost 2,000,000 electric water pumps annually which are distributed in 160 countries, giving the Company a truly global presence.

The range consists of 50 families of water pumps (including drainage, submersible and shallow well models) covering most applications in the domestic, civil, agricultural and industrial fields.

Pedrollo Spa is an industrial reality which bases the strength of its products on concrete and tangible facts.

Known worldwide, Pedrollo has yet to break in to the U.S. market. Beginning in March 2006, Pedrollo set up PD of Florida to do precisely that. We at Florida Pump Service are proud to be associated with the Pedrollo Family.

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Iron Bacteria Removal- Monday, July 29, 2013
Learn about the problems caused by Iron Bacteria and how Florida Pump Service can help you with this problem.

Iron Bacteria is one of three types of iron that can be produced from well water. The other two are (1) Iron stain and (2) Iron Clumps. In North Florida we rarely if ever have iron clumps. Iron Bacteria is a growing organism produced in approximately 10% of old or new wells. The real cause is not known. IT WILL NOT HARM YOU TO DRINK THE WATER, however its presence in the water can cause damage to expensive water conditioners, clog plumbing pipes and add cleanup time to bathrooms. The only man-made way to eliminate Iron Bacteria is to install a chlorine injection removal system (CIRS).

A CIRS system includes a chlorinator feed pump, a 10 gallon plastic chlorine mixing tank, an 80 to 120 gallon galvanized contact tank (a good used one will work) and a cartridge sediment filter. A CIRS system is installed before water reaches the house – between your present pump & tank and any water conditioner you might have. The CIRS system needs a minimum of a 12 SF area for proper installation. The chlorinator is piped to pull chlorine from the mixing tank and inject chlorine into the water line to the contact tank. The chlorinator is wired into the well pump. It runs only when the well pump runs. The chlorine mixes with the water in the contact tank and kills the Iron Bacteria. The Iron Bacteria sediment settles to the bottom of the tank. The water leaves the contact tank at the top and runs thru an installed cartridge filter. This filter removes any small dead Iron Bacteria residue still in the water. From there the water goes to your house or thru your water conditioner before the house. If you don’t have a water conditioner we highly recommend them. We also sell them.

The CIRS requires routine maintenance. Once a week the chlorine tank needs refilling. Once a year the contact tank needs to be drained and the cartridge filter replaced. Periodically the chlorinator injector and valves need to be cleaned (a 20 minute job). The average installation cost of a CIRS is $1,600, plus tax. The average annual costs for chlorine and cartridge filter are $15 to $20 a month.

NOTE: This information, while possibly available in your area, is intended for our customers in the northeast Florida area.

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